Author Topic: Appalachian Mountains  (Read 194 times)

Cody

  • Board_Of_Directors
  • Jr. Member: 50 to 99 posts
  • ****
  • Posts: 94
  • Prospector Cody Eastcoastprospecting.com
    • East Coast Prospecting
Appalachian Mountains
« on: December 14, 2018, 11:54:43 AM »
I am nerdy when it comes to three things. Computers, Gold Prospecting, and Gaming. I enjoy reading up on information that could potentially help me find a "Glory Hole". I find it very interesting that the Appalachian Mountains is thought to be the oldest mountain chain in the world.

"When the super-continent Pangaea formed a little more than 300 million years ago, Africa collided with North America," Wilcox explained. "This collision created mountains over 25,000 feet tall, similar to the modern Himalayas. The rocks of today?s Southern Appalachians were at the core of those mountains ? miles below the ground surface ? and contain evidence of those ancient collisions in their mineralogy, texture, and numerous folds and faults."

Knowing that the Appalachian Mountains are of that time period and that we do in fact find gold. Where are those old ancient dried up rivers? I know the rivers such as French Broad are old but they are still flowing. I have not looked into it but I am sure that those rivers are off limits to prospecting. Has anyone ever tested the "New River and or the French Broad"? I would be interested in testing them out if it is legal to do so.

"The New River is older than most rivers, but is it the second oldest in the world? There is a scientific argument that the New River might not even be the oldest river in its formation state of North Carolina. The French Broad River also rests on the crest of the Appalachian Mountains. Like the New River, it cut through the Appalachians as they rose."

So, where are these old dried up rivers that you hear about out west and other parts of the world containing amazing amounts of gold? Who has a house built on one of these? I have also done some digging and found that there is a small chain of metamorphic soil that runs from the Monroe county area up near my house. Don't ask me how this is possible, But I have followed it using the USA Geologic maps. I plan to do some more testing in creeks around my location. I did, in fact, find a few tiny TINY TINY specs of gold in a creek I live near. Grant it, I had to go very deep but still, it is a start!
I hope everyone has a Merry Christmas, now that my house is finished I hope this year I will be able to get out and help much more compared to last year!
Cody Frye
GPAA Member
Prospector Cody on Youtube
www.Eastcoastprospecting.com
www.Shopporterstire.com

Chuck Pharis

  • Ex President. Now Board Member
  • Administrator
  • One foot in the grave. 1750 to 1,999 posts
  • ******
  • Posts: 1772
  • Please do not text me. I do not use text.
    • Chuck Pharis Video
Re: Appalachian Mountains
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2018, 05:47:18 PM »
Gold is "where you find it". Today most Prospectors only think of weeks to years ago. Not thousands or millions of years ago. A lot has happened to Mother Earth since the Continents formed (and even before). Gold can be anywhere. Dig and test pan, dig and test pan,,,,,,, anywhere and everywhere. Gold has been found at the bottom of oceans and on the top of mountains. Just because you do not see the remains of a river or creek, that does not mean there was not one there millions of years ago.
If you watch Gold Rush on TV, you see how deep they have to dig to find the "pay layer". On the beaches around Nome Alaska, there are 3 known "pay layers". Miles inland miners are finding gold hundreds of feet down in old beaches.
There are gold mines all over the World with hundreds of miles of tunnels miles underground. Remember, gold came from "the big bang" in outer space and traveled to Earth on Comets and space dust. No gold formed on Earth! At one time when the Earth was all molten rock, gold was everywhere. The Earth is about 4.6 BILLION years old! Geologists have found rocks around 3.9 billion years old. You might actually find gold in the bottom of your toilet tank (if you use well water). TRUE!!!
You can also find tiny gold on most beaches through out the World. Even in bags of sand at Home Depot.
Chuck
Chuck Pharis
East Tennessee Coker Creek GPAA Chapter President (June 19, 2010 to June 20, 2015)  Member of the Board Of Directors.
GPAA Lifetime member, Former LDMA[/size]

coker creek gold fields

  • Newbie: 0 to 49 posts
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Re: Appalachian Mountains
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2018, 06:24:36 PM »
Hey Cody are you coming to the Gold Expedition this year if we have it.

Cody

  • Board_Of_Directors
  • Jr. Member: 50 to 99 posts
  • ****
  • Posts: 94
  • Prospector Cody Eastcoastprospecting.com
    • East Coast Prospecting
Re: Appalachian Mountains
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2018, 06:32:58 PM »
Chuck that is what I am saying, I want to learn more about following the land. It interests me greatly.

Miller's I will most definitely try to come back! You guys were an amazing host and I enjoyed every second of it! (Hopefully, I will have my dredge ready to go then) I went with DIY plan LOL, I know your husband advised not to. I got too many good deals to pass up, Air Compressor, Scuba Mask, Massive Keene Sluice with crash box, Keene pump, and much more LOL. I just could not pass that deal up. (this is another reason I am searching for land as well)
-Have you guys played in the water since then? :P
Cody Frye
GPAA Member
Prospector Cody on Youtube
www.Eastcoastprospecting.com
www.Shopporterstire.com

BigAl

  • Chapter President
  • Administrator
  • 49er. 1000 to 1249 posts!
  • ******
  • Posts: 1157
    • My Website
Re: Appalachian Mountains
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2018, 10:50:18 PM »
Cody,

Several years ago at my workplace we built a new plant. The location is along the Tennessee River in Loudon, Tennessee. There was a lot of excavation work done, and during that time the topsoil was stripped away. What was underneath was white rounded quartz pebbles and boulders. Under that yellow and red clay layers. The layers and lenses traverse at least several hundred yards in width. The crazy thing is that this land is 100  feet above the current river bottom. Judging from the size and sorting or the strata this was a significant waterway, most likely the ancestral Tennessee River.

Without all of the excavation I would have never seen any of this. The channels are here, but the vegetation covers it up.

To this point I have still not tested any of this material. Judging from what I know of the region I almost guarantee it has some amount of gold.

Al

Coker Creek Chapter President
Former Coker Creek GPAA Chapter Vice President (Sept 2008-June 2014)
atrotter3563@yahoo.com
www.ProspectorAl.com
YouTube.com/prospectoral
(865) 748-9818
GPAA Membership # 240748

ABrooks

  • Full Member: 100 to 249 posts
  • ***
  • Posts: 173
Re: Appalachian Mountains
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2018, 01:33:17 PM »
Cody,

Several years ago at my workplace we built a new plant. The location is along the Tennessee River in Loudon, Tennessee. There was a lot of excavation work done, and during that time the topsoil was stripped away. What was underneath was white rounded quartz pebbles and boulders. Under that yellow and red clay layers. The layers and lenses traverse at least several hundred yards in width. The crazy thing is that this land is 100  feet above the current river bottom. Judging from the size and sorting or the strata this was a significant waterway, most likely the ancestral Tennessee River.

Without all of the excavation I would have never seen any of this. The channels are here, but the vegetation covers it up.

To this point I have still not tested any of this material. Judging from what I know of the region I almost guarantee it has some amount of gold.

Al
Hey Al, me and you need to go test pan some of that material. Everytime I get into white quartz, when I'm panning, I typically find decent gold. I wonder if theres a way we could map out these ancient riverbeds. I remember stumbling across an article that mentioned that Spanish explorers traveled through the waterways of eastern Tennessee looking for gold. They often traded with the Indians, and the indians told them that there was gold here.
Austin (AKA The Gold Hound)

Cody

  • Board_Of_Directors
  • Jr. Member: 50 to 99 posts
  • ****
  • Posts: 94
  • Prospector Cody Eastcoastprospecting.com
    • East Coast Prospecting
Re: Appalachian Mountains
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2018, 05:01:10 PM »
Al, What is wrong with you! I would be sneaking Jars in to take home with me! That is amazing. I know there are ancient river beds here but how can the be located without digging? I have been looking at the US geological maps. Like I stated I have found a small stretch of metamorphic rock that starts down towards Monroe county and travels all the way up towards my location. I have a buddy who lives in this section of the map. He also has a small creek on his property. So, needless to say, I am very interested in testing it. Grant it, I don't expect much but I have found a few specs of gold across the ridge from this location. It is based in a sedimentary type of soil and a few specs were there.
Cody Frye
GPAA Member
Prospector Cody on Youtube
www.Eastcoastprospecting.com
www.Shopporterstire.com

hillbillygold

  • Board_Of_Directors
  • Sr. Member: 250 to 499 posts
  • ****
  • Posts: 415
  • GPAA member,WEGM member,board member,chapt. sec.
Re: Appalachian Mountains
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2019, 10:59:53 PM »
 Cody... threw a lot of local research and talking to some of the old codgers around here I have found out that there has been some gold found in the French Broad and Nolichucky as well as some silver just not in any quantity as well as in some of the other small creeks

Cody

  • Board_Of_Directors
  • Jr. Member: 50 to 99 posts
  • ****
  • Posts: 94
  • Prospector Cody Eastcoastprospecting.com
    • East Coast Prospecting
Re: Appalachian Mountains
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2019, 09:10:47 AM »
Yeah, I need to find more information on laws in regards to prospecting on those rivers. They all are about a stone throw away from my house.
Clinch is even closer (I did find one spec in Clinch) I was hoping to try a lot this winter but just not had time to do so.
Cody Frye
GPAA Member
Prospector Cody on Youtube
www.Eastcoastprospecting.com
www.Shopporterstire.com